A Little Piece of History

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This weekend we made a foray into the past. A few miles from our home is a small community that used to be a huge plantation. The community has preserved the buildings from that plantation in a small park. Saturday they opened the park for a a friendly celebration. I have tried to get to this town for as long as we’ve lived here, but the only time we venture to Scott is during the winter when they are all buttoned up for the season.

Here is the Scott Railroad Station.

This is an old railroad light. I just liked the shape of it.

Every plantation had its own blacksmith for obvious reasons. This is an example of a smithy. I don’t believe the whole methodology is entirely accurate, but it does give us good insight into the craft.

This smithy used coal to make his fire. That is a circular bellows to the left of the table to blow air into the fire.

The vintage anvil is awesome.

And the vintage vice.

This is a corn crib.

I like the vintage clothing too.

I encountered, what I have always considered a mystery to me, sorghum processing. I use sorghum molasses in my bread. It’s origin has always been confusing, even after googling it. Today the shadows are cleared and full understanding emerges. Here is what the plant looks like…

To me, this plant looks like a weed. One of the gentlemen processing it kindly demonstrated the nature of sorghum to me.

He peeled away the sheath to expose the cane beneath. When chewed, the inside is sugar sweet! This is where sorghum originates.

So the cane is cut down …..

…. then processed in a mill. This mill is powered by a team of Belgian horses. The mill crushes the cane to extract the sweet liquid inside.

Cane is fed into the mill on the left. The gentleman in the center monitors the liquid and the crushed waste comes out the right side.

I love this team of mares. This breed is bred for this sort of work.

One of the mares also has foul here…

I just love that the little fellow had free reign of the place as his mama worked.

Sorghum is cooked down in a boiler to make the dark, thick syrup we know as molasses. This is the cooking area.

So plantations made their own sorghum molasses as well as provided their own bee hives for honey. I stand amazed at the self-sufficiency of these large farms. They also provided the workers, this is after the Civil War, with groceries and as-sundries through a commissary.

The interior is no different from any mercantile of the era I’ve had the privilege of touring.

This commissary lived on the Marlsgate plantation. We looked at the ledgers on this desk. Living history. I can’t tell you how it fascinates me.

Even more enthralling to me is the equipment displayed. This large-scale…

… and this old mill to grind wheat into flour, or other grains.

This is only half of what we took in. I am enthralled with all things from the past. This plantation had more on it. This post would be waaaay too long for it all. I’ll post the rest in the next post of the week.

I truly loved vicariously reliving this tiny bit of history. Let me know what fascinating history is in your area of the world.

Thanks for letting me share this little piece of heaven with you.

Love,
Jeannene

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2 responses »

  1. Is this in Louisiana, I know we have a town named Scott near Lafayette? Have you ever gone to the Louisiana Rural Museum in Baton Rouge? It’s amazing and well worth the trip. Expect to spend several hours.

    Thanks for the pictorial tour, I love the old period as well. Everyone WAS self-sufficient, and the large plantations were miniature villages. It’s fascinating.

    Like

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