Monthly Archives: June 2010

Weekend Muse

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This weekend was the Arkansas Writer’s Conference in town. It was wonderful connecting with writers of all genres and finding the wonderful people in my area. I learned a bunch, being as I am, as a novice, a blank slate and anything you throw at me will stick somewhere on that slate.

More encouraging than even the small glimmers of knowledge was the renewed muse in my writing. Thursday, before the conference even started, a boring trip into town resulted in a wonderful idea for a novella. I sketched the thing out that afternoon.

At the conference more details of the climax to my WIP resolved itself from a scene already written into the middle of the book. I almost couldn’t contain myself as I attempted to take notes of the new revelation and notes from the speaker at the time. If the weekend didn’t yield another thing, that was worth it in itself. Wooo wooo! I have been struggling with this climax and all the details tying into each other and this event makes it complete.

Then this morning, as I’m sitting there waiting for the first speaker to be announced, a little short story hit my brain. I am getting that down tonight.

I just love it when my brain relaxes and something worth while actually oozes out of it.

I know this isn’t much, but it is my personal piece of heaven today.

Love,
Jeannene

Strong Cowboys

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I have one more set of pictures of the rodeo I’d like to share.
I love big strong, strapping, virile men (that’s why I married one) but this event exhibits that brawn to the fullest. This is what is called “Bull-Dogging”. For any of you who are unfamiliar with rodeo jargon, bull-dogging is when the cowboy chases a steer from the line from his horse. He slides out of the saddle and wraps his thick muscled arms around the steer’s neck while digging in his heels to break its run. At the same time he wrestles the steer’s head by turning it around at its neck and bringing the rest of its body to the ground. This is also referred to as “steer wrestling”.

It takes a lot of grit and muscle to bring a five hundred pound steer to the ground.

I managed to get a number of these in sequence so watch and enjoy.

Uh, oh. This one looks like it’ll get away from him.

And that ladies and gentlemen, is how it is done.

This is so hard to do. I know I never would have thought about wrestling a steer to the ground. This cowboy did a beautiful job. I had a great time taking these shots.

Today’s heavenly slice.

Love,
Jeannene

Bewildered Bird

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Yesterday evening, after the evening meal and we were all settled into our prebedtime rituals, a horrible ruckus emanated from the east porch. To put simply, it was a cacophony of chicken cackling and clucking.
I assumed it was one of the cats. All a cat has to do is walk too close to the roost to set them off. But there was no cat in the vicinity.

We sent Ben out to investigate and he poked his head back in the door and asked, “Can I shoot it?”

CM and I both thought he referred to a pesky possum. The kid just grinned from ear to ear. That was sure indication further investigation must ensue.

When we stepped out to view the instigator of the disturbance. A quick perusal of the wider area revealed this.

That would be an easy target. He figured his .22 would yield him fresh turkey meat. Of course, no turkey season in progress and the thought was quickly quashed.

Looks like we have a wayward turkey. Can you make it out? Turkeys live in the woods back there, but they only venture out in groups. I’ve never seen one all alone.

Can you see more clearly? I am not a turkey expert, but this looks like a female bird. She didn’t startle when we all congregated on the east porch. She wandered in a circle out in the pasture.

She moved off very slowly as if she were lost or looking for something. I am ignorant when it comes to turkey behavior, but I think this bird was losing her marbles.

It took a few minutes, but she made progress up the hill. She just wondered slowly and quietly.

Steady progress.

The chickens ceased their noises and this disoriented hen disappeared into the wood.

I didn’t even know this little piece of heaven lived back in the woods.

Love,
Jeannene